Our October update is a focus on confidentiality and monitoring. These are areas that we are advising on more frequently and which have been more of a focus since the data protection changes. Covert Recordings – are they admissible? With the use of i-phones and other similar devices, you are best placed to assume that…

In June the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Whistleblowing released their report outlining the experiences of whistle-blowers in the UK and highlighting where legislation continues to fail individuals seeking its protection. Following responses from over 400 individuals the APPG have branded the current regulatory framework ‘complicated, cumbersome, obsolete and fragmented’. To remedy this the APPG…

If anyone had been lulled into a false sense of security by the absence of the much vaunted mega fines in the aftermath of GDPR coming into force, then they would have been rudely awakened when in July 2019 the ICO announced their intention to fine British Airways and Marriott International £183.39m and £99.2m respectively,…

The fundamental importance of the appeal stage of a dismissal has been reinforced recently by the Employment Appeal Tribunal’s decision in Baldeh v Churches Housing Association of Dudley and District Ltd. Mrs Baldeh, a housing support worker, was dismissed by her employer at the end of a six month probationary period as a result of…

As we have recently passed the first anniversary of GDPR coming into force, we have taken stock of the changes and look forward to what lies ahead. In the first year: Businesses reported 14,000 personal data breaches to the ICO between 25 May 2018 and 1 May 2019, an increase of over 10,000 from the…

Another gig economy case has found in favour of the “workers” after an Employment Tribunal ruled that 27 “educators” at the National Gallery were workers not self-employed contractors. The 27 claimants, who collectively had over 500 years’ experience working for the gallery, brought claims for unfair dismissal, discrimination, unpaid holiday pay and failure to consult…

April has traditionally been a busy month for employment law and 2019 is proving no different. The usual increases and updates to various rates and limits have taken place along with the deadline for the second round of gender pay gap reports and the introduction of the Government’s new rules on payslips. Minimum wage •…

On 4 March 2019 the Government published a consultation paper outlining its proposals to better regulate the use of confidentiality clauses in employment contracts and settlement agreements. While acknowledging that there are legitimate commercial reasons to require confidentiality clauses, the Government has become concerned that they are being abused by a small minority of employers….

In December 2018, the Government published the Good Work Plan (GWP) in response to the Taylor Review on modern working practices. Recent cases have highlighted the recurring issues over employment status and the Government has a desire for more transparency as a result. A summary of some of the main proposals can be found below;…

Restrictive covenants play a vital role in protecting any business. They are a measure used by employers to ensure that client contacts, key relationships and employees in certain roles are secured. The recent case of Tenon FM Limited and Susan Cawley is a useful reminder of the basic principles that are necessary when seeking to…

Links: Privacy & Cookies / Terms of Use / Copyright 2018